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In a recent article at Nokia Conversations, there was this conversation talking about the Xbox evolving through your Windows Phone. And yes, this is something that is happening now through the XBox Companion application for Windows Phone. Still, I see this as not pushing far enough into this idea that mobile should enable augmented reality experiences. In Nokia’s article, the mobile is set too much as the slave to the context, even with their request to asking for what more can be done.


Here is my comment as posted on the article:

You know, given the history (N95, N-Gage, and TV-Out), I would have expected the mobile to be the gaming console, connecting to XBox (Nintendo, or PS) gaming services, and then gesture tracking and all to be done in that manner. Sure, it would mean mobiles putting all of that processing they are getting now to use, but it would have been that logical evolution.

That said, using the mobile as a companion “wand” to the console experience makes sense as another spoke in that evolution. I just don’t know if it does the mobile justice to do that companion duty though if it has only one state (items above). The mobile needs to evolve based on the context, and behavior patterns of the mobile owner. Then the console itself adapts to the room-media experience.

Now, Nokia does have an issue here. I am not saying that what they are doing with XBox Companion is not innovative, only, not as far a push as they have been able to do in the past. That’s the part of things we will want call things out on. It’s not enough to enable that console experience, but shouldn’t the mobile already connect to that experience.

I know, I know. I just came from a conference about mobile ministry and am still pushing and begging for folks to actually demonstrate relevant, productive use of a mobile given what makes these devices tick. And then let the services come in and amplify that. We shouldn’t go backwards, or at least Nokia shouldn’t. They did this much a half-decade plus ago. If the mobile is going to be a wand, let’s push that wand metaphor further than the constraints of a console.

Or, let’s let someone else play off the lessons we once thought were amazing.

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